Aus dem Leben eines Musikersby Fritz Busch

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Aus dem Leben eines Musikers by Fritz BuschReview by: Karl GeiringerNotes, Second Series, Vol. 7, No. 4 (Sep., 1950), pp. 566-567Published by: Music Library AssociationStable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/889796 .Accessed: 16/06/2014 13:51Your use of the JSTOR archive indicates your acceptance of the Terms & Conditions of Use, available at .http://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsp .JSTOR is a not-for-profit service that helps scholars, researchers, and students discover, use, and build upon a wide range ofcontent in a trusted digital archive. We use information technology and tools to increase productivity and facilitate new formsof scholarship. For more information about JSTOR, please contact support@jstor.org. .Music Library Association is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve and extend access to Notes.http://www.jstor.org This content downloaded from 185.44.77.34 on Mon, 16 Jun 2014 13:51:42 PMAll use subject to JSTOR Terms and Conditionshttp://www.jstor.org/action/showPublisher?publisherCode=muliashttp://www.jstor.org/stable/889796?origin=JSTOR-pdfhttp://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsphttp://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jspfinally embraced Christianity in Parsifal is immaterial, for his earlier writings, based on resentment of Catholicism and its Judaic origins, as well as on the con- flict between the German concepts of Volk and Kultur and Christian doctrine, fully substantiate Stein's conclusions. The book contains two appendices, one discussing the question of Geyer's pater- nity, the second listing Wagner's literary works under the heading: "A Chrono- logical Outline of Wagner [!] to Which Diiect or Indirect Reference Has Been Made." There is also a not too exhaus- tive bibliography of 126 titles, in which one again notices the amateurish proof- reading for which The Philosophical Library has become notorious. For ex- ample, the umlauts in many names such as Biicken and Gotterdimmerung are omitted; Bayreuther Blitter appears as Bayreuth Blatter; and the source of three finally embraced Christianity in Parsifal is immaterial, for his earlier writings, based on resentment of Catholicism and its Judaic origins, as well as on the con- flict between the German concepts of Volk and Kultur and Christian doctrine, fully substantiate Stein's conclusions. The book contains two appendices, one discussing the question of Geyer's pater- nity, the second listing Wagner's literary works under the heading: "A Chrono- logical Outline of Wagner [!] to Which Diiect or Indirect Reference Has Been Made." There is also a not too exhaus- tive bibliography of 126 titles, in which one again notices the amateurish proof- reading for which The Philosophical Library has become notorious. For ex- ample, the umlauts in many names such as Biicken and Gotterdimmerung are omitted; Bayreuther Blitter appears as Bayreuth Blatter; and the source of three articles by Mr. Stein is printed, in rapid succession and with fascinating variety, as Chicago Jewish Forum, Chicago-Jewish Forum, and Chicago Jewish Forum (all three should have "Magazine" appended to them). But these are trivia. In respect to the sources of Nazism, including Wagner himself, and the effect of the latter's ideas upon H. S. Chamberlain, Rosen- berg, and Hitler, this book merely en- larges upon the conclusions to which Peter Viereck came in his Metapolitics (New York, 1941). Although part of the territory explored is therefore not exactly virgin, the value of Stein's contribution lies in his thoroughgoing analysis and interpretation of Wagner's racial-political writings, especially those related to Men- delssohn, and their influence upon later music historians. WALTER H. RUBSAMEN articles by Mr. Stein is printed, in rapid succession and with fascinating variety, as Chicago Jewish Forum, Chicago-Jewish Forum, and Chicago Jewish Forum (all three should have "Magazine" appended to them). But these are trivia. In respect to the sources of Nazism, including Wagner himself, and the effect of the latter's ideas upon H. S. Chamberlain, Rosen- berg, and Hitler, this book merely en- larges upon the conclusions to which Peter Viereck came in his Metapolitics (New York, 1941). Although part of the territory explored is therefore not exactly virgin, the value of Stein's contribution lies in his thoroughgoing analysis and interpretation of Wagner's racial-political writings, especially those related to Men- delssohn, and their influence upon later music historians. WALTER H. RUBSAMEN Aus dem Leben eines Musikers. By Fritz Busch. Zurich: Rascher Verlag, [1949]. [223 p., illus., ports., music; Sw. francs 15.80] Aus dem Leben eines Musikers. By Fritz Busch. Zurich: Rascher Verlag, [1949]. [223 p., illus., ports., music; Sw. francs 15.80] To the student of operatic events in Germany the name of Fritz Busch is in- extricably connected with that of the Dresden Opera. At the age of 32 this great conductor, whose rise to fame had been spectacular, became the Dresden Opera's director, and in the eleven years of his reign the institution grew into one of the most important operatic centers of the world. The Dresden Opera was truly progressive both in the patronage of contemporary works, in which it far out- distanced other leading institutions such as the Vienna State Opera, and in the lovingly prepared revivals of older operas, among which the production of Boris Godounov, for instance, in 1923, made history in Germany. World premieres of various Strauss operas at Dresden drew attention to the Saxon capital and for some time there was even a plan to establish a branch of the Juilliard School there (a plan which came to nothing because of the narrow-mindedness of the Saxon officials). Opera lovers will therefore be inter- ested to learn more about this important chapter in German operatic history from the man who was responsible for it. To the student of operatic events in Germany the name of Fritz Busch is in- extricably connected with that of the Dresden Opera. At the age of 32 this great conductor, whose rise to fame had been spectacular, became the Dresden Opera's director, and in the eleven years of his reign the institution grew into one of the most important operatic centers of the world. The Dresden Opera was truly progressive both in the patronage of contemporary works, in which it far out- distanced other leading institutions such as the Vienna State Opera, and in the lovingly prepared revivals of older operas, among which the production of Boris Godounov, for instance, in 1923, made history in Germany. World premieres of various Strauss operas at Dresden drew attention to the Saxon capital and for some time there was even a plan to establish a branch of the Juilliard School there (a plan which came to nothing because of the narrow-mindedness of the Saxon officials). Opera lovers will therefore be inter- ested to learn more about this important chapter in German operatic history from the man who was responsible for it. Busch tells his story in a refreshingly unassuming manner, with occasional humorous asides. This reviewer de- lighted, for instance, in the story of the contralto with a very deep range, sent for final training to Lilli Lehmann, whom the teacher forced to study the two arias of the "Queen of the Night." "When" (continues Busch) "the unlucky girl after a year of study sang to me in a thin, shaking voice, 'Revenge throbs in my heart,' I couldn't but find her claim justified." On the whole, however, the Dresden story is anything but humor- ous; it becomes wrought with tension when we witness the disastrous rise to power of the Nazis. Busch, although not political-minded, was firmly against the Hitler regime and all it stood for, and his name will go down in history as one of the lamentably few great German artists who had the courage not to yield to Nazi persuasion. Of course so un- friendly an attitude had to be punished, and after being the victim of a poisonous press campaign Busch was deprived of his office in the most degrading fashion. This was a purely local affair and Busch might have got a position elsewhere in Busch tells his story in a refreshingly unassuming manner, with occasional humorous asides. This reviewer de- lighted, for instance, in the story of the contralto with a very deep range, sent for final training to Lilli Lehmann, whom the teacher forced to study the two arias of the "Queen of the Night." "When" (continues Busch) "the unlucky girl after a year of study sang to me in a thin, shaking voice, 'Revenge throbs in my heart,' I couldn't but find her claim justified." On the whole, however, the Dresden story is anything but humor- ous; it becomes wrought with tension when we witness the disastrous rise to power of the Nazis. Busch, although not political-minded, was firmly against the Hitler regime and all it stood for, and his name will go down in history as one of the lamentably few great German artists who had the courage not to yield to Nazi persuasion. Of course so un- friendly an attitude had to be punished, and after being the victim of a poisonous press campaign Busch was deprived of his office in the most degrading fashion. This was a purely local affair and Busch might have got a position elsewhere in 566 566 This content downloaded from 185.44.77.34 on Mon, 16 Jun 2014 13:51:42 PMAll use subject to JSTOR Terms and Conditionshttp://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jspGermany. He was even invited to con- duct at Bayreuth in place of Toscanini, who had cancelled his engagement as a gesture against Hitler, but the artist felt this to be incompatible with his integrity; he accepted a call from the Teatro Colon, Buenos Aires, and has never returned to Germany again. A sad story indeed, the reading of which might be quite beneficial for those who tend to forget what happened in Hitler's Germany! But also, apart from the book's political and human signifi- cance, there are many interesting details Germany. He was even invited to con- duct at Bayreuth in place of Toscanini, who had cancelled his engagement as a gesture against Hitler, but the artist felt this to be incompatible with his integrity; he accepted a call from the Teatro Colon, Buenos Aires, and has never returned to Germany again. A sad story indeed, the reading of which might be quite beneficial for those who tend to forget what happened in Hitler's Germany! But also, apart from the book's political and human signifi- cance, there are many interesting details Germany. He was even invited to con- duct at Bayreuth in place of Toscanini, who had cancelled his engagement as a gesture against Hitler, but the artist felt this to be incompatible with his integrity; he accepted a call from the Teatro Colon, Buenos Aires, and has never returned to Germany again. A sad story indeed, the reading of which might be quite beneficial for those who tend to forget what happened in Hitler's Germany! But also, apart from the book's political and human signifi- cance, there are many interesting details in it concerning contemporary musicians, including Strauss, Reger, and Tovey. Par- ticularly enjoyable are the first chapters dealing with the childhood of Fritz and Adolf Busch in a home steeped in music, which in many ways reminds us of that of Johannes Brahms. Here, too, the father, a peasant's son, was driven by a consuming zest for music which made him break with the way of life of his forbears. Like Jakob Brahms, he also had the joy of seeing his dreams come true in his sons. KARL GEIRINGER in it concerning contemporary musicians, including Strauss, Reger, and Tovey. Par- ticularly enjoyable are the first chapters dealing with the childhood of Fritz and Adolf Busch in a home steeped in music, which in many ways reminds us of that of Johannes Brahms. Here, too, the father, a peasant's son, was driven by a consuming zest for music which made him break with the way of life of his forbears. Like Jakob Brahms, he also had the joy of seeing his dreams come true in his sons. KARL GEIRINGER in it concerning contemporary musicians, including Strauss, Reger, and Tovey. Par- ticularly enjoyable are the first chapters dealing with the childhood of Fritz and Adolf Busch in a home steeped in music, which in many ways reminds us of that of Johannes Brahms. Here, too, the father, a peasant's son, was driven by a consuming zest for music which made him break with the way of life of his forbears. Like Jakob Brahms, he also had the joy of seeing his dreams come true in his sons. KARL GEIRINGER Prinzip einer Systematik der Musikinstrumente. [By] Hans Heinz Drager. (Musikwissenschaftliche Arbeiten, herausgegeben von der Gesellschaft fur Musikforschung, Nr. 3) Kassel, Basel: Barenreiter Verlag, [1948] [49, (3) p.] In reviewing this little book, I take a time, how agile it is from musico- thc ability and competence of the author technical viewpoints, how long it sustains fcr granted; Dr. Driger is a first-rate it3 tone and how loud it is, how wide its scholar and knows his field. The ques- scope of intensity and the range of its tions arising from the perusal of his text pitches are, how many degrees per and classification tables involve rather octave it offers (such as five, twelve, or the eternal problem of classification itself. twenty-four tones), and what its timbre Driger's starting point is the classifica- is and how much it can be changed. I tion scheme that the present reviewer and may be allowed to suggest that the whole the late Erich M. von Hornbostel pub- concept of classification has been over- lished jointly in the Zeitschrift fiir done. A surrealistic painting may pre- Ethnologie (1914). We devised it primar- sent a human face in front, in profile, ily for anthropologists and curators of and from the rear at once, but any real- ethnological museums in order to put an istic picture clings to one definite view- end to the deadly confusion of terms point from which its perspective devolves used at random both in books and in into a vanishing point. But then, classi- collections. fication in any field of knowledge, far Driger's purpose is more ambitious. from being an end in itself, rather reflects He tries to catch all possible aspects the attitude of its author and time. If that the musical instrument offers in one such is the case, Drager's paper shows consistent classification: its form and how rich and manifold his and our ap- material, how it produces sound, whether proach has become. And for this we it is able to play one or several tones at should be grateful. CURT SACHS Prinzip einer Systematik der Musikinstrumente. [By] Hans Heinz Drager. (Musikwissenschaftliche Arbeiten, herausgegeben von der Gesellschaft fur Musikforschung, Nr. 3) Kassel, Basel: Barenreiter Verlag, [1948] [49, (3) p.] In reviewing this little book, I take a time, how agile it is from musico- thc ability and competence of the author technical viewpoints, how long it sustains fcr granted; Dr. Driger is a first-rate it3 tone and how loud it is, how wide its scholar and knows his field. The ques- scope of intensity and the range of its tions arising from the perusal of his text pitches are, how many degrees per and classification tables involve rather octave it offers (such as five, twelve, or the eternal problem of classification itself. twenty-four tones), and what its timbre Driger's starting point is the classifica- is and how much it can be changed. I tion scheme that the present reviewer and may be allowed to suggest that the whole the late Erich M. von Hornbostel pub- concept of classification has been over- lished jointly in the Zeitschrift fiir done. A surrealistic painting may pre- Ethnologie (1914). We devised it primar- sent a human face in front, in profile, ily for anthropologists and curators of and from the rear at once, but any real- ethnological museums in order to put an istic picture clings to one definite view- end to the deadly confusion of terms point from which its perspective devolves used at random both in books and in into a vanishing point. But then, classi- collections. fication in any field of knowledge, far Driger's purpose is more ambitious. from being an end in itself, rather reflects He tries to catch all possible aspects the attitude of its author and time. If that the musical instrument offers in one such is the case, Drager's paper shows consistent classification: its form and how rich and manifold his and our ap- material, how it produces sound, whether proach has become. And for this we it is able to play one or several tones at should be grateful. CURT SACHS Prinzip einer Systematik der Musikinstrumente. [By] Hans Heinz Drager. (Musikwissenschaftliche Arbeiten, herausgegeben von der Gesellschaft fur Musikforschung, Nr. 3) Kassel, Basel: Barenreiter Verlag, [1948] [49, (3) p.] In reviewing this little book, I take a time, how agile it is from musico- thc ability and competence of the author technical viewpoints, how long it sustains fcr granted; Dr. Driger is a first-rate it3 tone and how loud it is, how wide its scholar and knows his field. The ques- scope of intensity and the range of its tions arising from the perusal of his text pitches are, how many degrees per and classification tables involve rather octave it offers (such as five, twelve, or the eternal problem of classification itself. twenty-four tones), and what its timbre Driger's starting point is the classifica- is and how much it can be changed. I tion scheme that the present reviewer and may be allowed to suggest that the whole the late Erich M. von Hornbostel pub- concept of classification has been over- lished jointly in the Zeitschrift fiir done. A surrealistic painting may pre- Ethnologie (1914). We devised it primar- sent a human face in front, in profile, ily for anthropologists and curators of and from the rear at once, but any real- ethnological museums in order to put an istic picture clings to one definite view- end to the deadly confusion of terms point from which its perspective devolves used at random both in books and in into a vanishing point. But then, classi- collections. fication in any field of knowledge, far Driger's purpose is more ambitious. from being an end in itself, rather reflects He tries to catch all possible aspects the attitude of its author and time. If that the musical instrument offers in one such is the case, Drager's paper shows consistent classification: its form and how rich and manifold his and our ap- material, how it produces sound, whether proach has become. And for this we it is able to play one or several tones at should be grateful. CURT SACHS Mister Jelly Roll; The Fortunes of Jelly Roll Morton, New Orleans Creole and "Inventor of Jazz." By Alan Lomax. Drawings by David Stone Martin. New York: Duell, Sloan and Pearce [1950]. [xvii, 318 p., illus., port., music; $3.50] In May 1938, a 52-year-old Creole, orig- in the Library of Congress to begin what inally named Ferdinand J. La Menthe turned out to be a month-long recording but known since his early teens as "Jelly for the Archive of American Folk Song. Roll Morton," sat down at the Steinway Under the skillful guidance of unobtru- on the stage of the Coolidge Auditorium sive questioning from Alan Lomax, sitting 567 Mister Jelly Roll; The Fortunes of Jelly Roll Morton, New Orleans Creole and "Inventor of Jazz." By Alan Lomax. Drawings by David Stone Martin. New York: Duell, Sloan and Pearce [1950]. [xvii, 318 p., illus., port., music; $3.50] In May 1938, a 52-year-old Creole, orig- in the Library of Congress to begin what inally named Ferdinand J. La Menthe turned out to be a month-long recording but known since his early teens as "Jelly for the Archive of American Folk Song. Roll Morton," sat down at the Steinway Under the skillful guidance of unobtru- on the stage of the Coolidge Auditorium sive questioning from Alan Lomax, sitting 567 Mister Jelly Roll; The Fortunes of Jelly Roll Morton, New Orleans Creole and "Inventor of Jazz." By Alan Lomax. Drawings by David Stone Martin. New York: Duell, Sloan and Pearce [1950]. [xvii, 318 p., illus., port., music; $3.50] In May 1938, a 52-year-old Creole, orig- in the Library of Congress to begin what inally named Ferdinand J. La Menthe turned out to be a month-long recording but known since his early teens as "Jelly for the Archive of American Folk Song. Roll Morton," sat down at the Steinway Under the skillful guidance of unobtru- on the stage of the Coolidge Auditorium sive questioning from Alan Lomax, sitting 567 This content downloaded from 185.44.77.34 on Mon, 16 Jun 2014 13:51:42 PMAll use subject to JSTOR Terms and Conditionshttp://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jspArticle Contentsp. 566p. 567Issue Table of ContentsNotes, Second Series, Vol. 7, No. 4 (Sep., 1950), pp. 495-658Front Matter [pp. 495-518]Second World Congress of Music Libraries [pp. 519-521]A Bibliography of Song Sheets Sports and Recreations in American Popular Songs: Part II [pp. 522-561]Book ReviewsReview: untitled [pp. 562-564]Review: untitled [pp. 564-565]Review: untitled [pp. 565-566]Review: untitled [pp. 566-567]Review: untitled [p. 567]Review: untitled [pp. 567-569]Review: untitled [pp. 569-570]Review: untitled [pp. 570-571]Review: untitled [pp. 571-572]Review: untitled [pp. 572-573]Review: untitled [pp. 573-574]Review: untitled [pp. 574-575]Review: untitled [pp. 575-576]Briefly NotedReview: untitled [p. 576]Review: untitled [pp. 576-577]Review: untitled [p. 577]Review: untitled [pp. 577-578]Review: untitled [p. 578]Review: untitled [p. 578]Review: untitled [pp. 578-579]Other Publications [pp. 579-582]Index of Record Reviews [pp. 583-598]Recording Symposium II [pp. 599-608]Notes for NOTES [pp. 609-612]Bibliography of Asiatic Musics, Twelfth Installment [pp. 613-621]Music ReviewsReview: untitled [pp. 622-624]Review: untitled [pp. 624-625]Review: untitled [p. 625]Review: untitled [p. 626]Review: untitled [pp. 626-627]Review: untitled [pp. 627-628]Review: untitled [pp. 628-629]Review: untitled [p. 629]Review: untitled [pp. 629-630]Johann Sebastian Bach [pp. 630-633]Choral MusicReview: untitled [pp. 633-634]Review: untitled [p. 634]Review: untitled [p. 634]Review: untitled [p. 634]Review: untitled [pp. 634-635]Review: untitled [p. 635]Review: untitled [p. 635]Review: untitled [p. 635]Review: untitled [p. 635]Review: untitled [p. 635]Review: untitled [pp. 635-636]Solo SongsReview: untitled [p. 636]Review: untitled [p. 636]Review: untitled [p. 636]Review: untitled [pp. 636-637]Review: untitled [p. 637]Review: untitled [p. 637]Review: untitled [p. 637]Review: untitled [p. 637]Review: untitled [p. 637]Review: untitled [pp. 637-638]Organ MusicReview: untitled [p. 638]Review: untitled [p. 638]Review: untitled [p. 638]Review: untitled [pp. 638-639]Selected Current Popular Music [pp. 639-640]Publications Received [pp. 640-650]Back Matter [pp. 651-658]